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Embracing Procrastination AND Developing Discipline

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In my quest to better understand how people are uniquely wired so as to better leverage gifts / talents / strengths / type, I learned that chronic procrastination can actually be attributed to certain personality types.  (Ahem … yes, including my own)

 Wow!  It is actually part of how I am wired and that can’t make it wrong, right?  I embrace my procrastination, fully!!!

Yes, there can be benefits to understanding one’s procrastination.  For me, I am EXTREMELY efficient AND effective and even quite creative under the “healthy” tension created towards the end of that procrastination cycle.  I have also come to understand that some behaviors I previously thought were attributed to procrastination in the way I work actually are not.  For example, I cannot just sit down and begin to write or create, I have to learn, think, and talk about it A WHOLE LOT before I’ve formed the idea well enough to begin writing.  Because of the way I mentally process in this way, when I do sit down to write, the ideas are more fully formed and that is part of the reason why I can knock it out so very quickly.

This is just one personal example related to my own unique wiring.  It makes me wonder about others’ and how their unique wiring mixes with procrastination behaviors in different ways.

But what about discipline?  Does a correlation exists between the two?  Do all extreme procrastinators, also consistently lack the ability to develop discipline in all aspects of life?  It can affect home, relationships, health, sleep, spirit, and just about anything else you can think of.

Nothing [is] so fatiguing as the eternal hanging on of an uncompleted task.”
–William James

After searching for resources on the development of discipline, I failed to find anything connecting the two together.

So, the question becomes:

How do procrastinators embrace the creative attributes that lead to procrastination while also developing discipline capabilities to better work towards and achieve goals?

Maybe there’s another way to look at it, another word besides “discipline”.  This reminds me of the process I use when leading teams through the Go Put Your Strengths To Work process by Marcus Buckingham.  After identifying your weaknesses, look at them through the lens of your strengths.  How might you re-frame weaknesses or use your strengths to accomplish the desired outcome as a way to skirt those weaknesses?

In the same way, how might you analyze your procrastination through the lens of your unique strengths?  How might you even leverage your strengths / preferences / type to overcome some of the negative affects of procrastination while still harnessing some of the creative benefits?

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