Archive

Posts Tagged ‘authenticity’

Start Your Career Transition: Step 3 – Word Research

October 17, 2011 1 comment

[tweetmeme]

In this step, you get to do job REsearch, without job searching.  Job research for the sake of finding words and work activities that sound interesting to you.  This step will help you focus future job search (or job creation) activities on the type of work that most interests you, leverages how you are uniquely wired, and provides engaging challenges.

Online Job Research

  1. Go online, at least two or three times, and look at job postings that look interesting.
  2. IGNORE job qualifications at this stage (remember, this activity is NOT an actual job search).
  3. Capture critical information along the way:
  • search terms that produce interesting job results,
  • job titles that seem exciting and just sound “cool” to you, and
  • job responsibilities that you find within job descriptions that seem exceptionally interesting.

Read more…

Advertisements

Start Your Career Transition: Step 2 – Engage Others

October 10, 2011 2 comments

[tweetmeme]

Step 2 – Engage Others

Now that you have a clear picture of yourself (see Step 1 post), take some time to engage others who know you, such as:  friends, family, co-workers, peers, clients, professional colleagues, fellow volunteers, etc.  Think of ~15-25 people who you can invite to participate in your journey – more is better.  Tell them you are seeking some feedback from people who know you or who you’ve worked with as you do some career and life planning.  Ask for 15 minutes of their time (or take the opportunity for a longer coffee meet-up or lunch, or …).

Questions

  1. How would you describe me and my work?  As if you were recommending me for a job or someone asked you as a reference.  Please be honest with things you think are good or might seem bad.
  2. How does it FEEL to work with me?  They may struggle with this one a little, but allow them time to think and process.  You may need to offer one word that another person used in response to this question to help get them started.

What You Are Doing During the Conversation

Read more…

Start Your Career Transition, Step 1- First Know Thyself

October 3, 2011 2 comments

[tweetmeme]

I was privileged again recently to speak with someone interested in making a career transition.  She wanted to make sure she didn’t just transition without being thoughtful in how she proceeded.  Frustration and longing for something different can actually get in the way of thinking about how to tactically move forward.  This series offers several steps to help you get moving forward in a purposeful way.

Step 1 – First Know Thyself

Use several different sources to get a crisp picture of who you are – to take a long, slow, inquisitive look into a looking-glass to discover and learn about how you are uniquely designed:

  • What you are great at doing
  • What you love to do
  • What you are passionate about / what gets you jazzed-up and excited
  • What you want in life
  • In what way / environment you do your best work
  • How you communicate and relate with others
  • What is most important to you

Do some assessments and use other resources to better understand yourself.  If you have access to these types of tools at work, say YES!  If not, there are some great reasonably priced resources (several provided below).  Read more…

A Moment of Clarity – The Power of Self-Knowledge

September 28, 2011 Leave a comment

[tweetmeme]

Have you ever had the gift of witnessing one of those “ah ha!” moments when a child / teen / youth / young person / youngun’ realizes something about themselves?  The kind of clarity that maybe you wish you found earlier in your life?  The sort of self-knowledge that can have a huge impact on how you work and interact with others in all kinds of useful circumstance?

I witnessed this with my daughter when I shared some “style” information.  She was able to say “that’s exactly what I do!”  The best part of this experience, however, was to see her put this knowledge to use.  To recognize when she was using her back-up style (aka verbal attack, but we call it “going to the dark side”) and stop it in its tracks.  She redirected her energy and melt-down was avoided. 

Momma, so proud!

The first step is awareness, and then you have the foundation to do something, to put this knowledge to good use.

I challenge you to:

  1. know more about your nature tendencies or style,
  2. define how it affects interactions with the people in your live and your work, and
  3. pick the element that seems to get in the way the most and choose one simple method to get around it in the future.  You might find the following STOP Interview (from Marcus Buckingham) to be a helpful way to think through this step:
    • Can you just Stop doing that behavior?
    • Can you Team up with someone, Transfer the activity to someone else, or Transition to something different?
    • Can you Offer up one of your strengths as an alternative way to deal with the current situation?
    • Can you simply Perceive this behavior from the perspective of your strengths?

Know, and be Free!

5 Steps to Make Your Vision for a Balanced Life Possible

August 9, 2011 4 comments

[tweetmeme]

So many of us struggle with how to have focus in our life and how to find better balance with work and family, and other things we care about.  Following are some steps that I find works best:

Step 1: Define Your Vision

Know what you want in life (&/or what you are called to do) as a mother / wife / family member, as a professional, and as a person (we are more than just our roles of Mom, Wife, and Professional!). Listen to your heart, identify what you get excited and passionate about, talk with people who care about and know you well.  You may find that taking some assessments, doing reflection activities, or even working with a coach can help you find clarity in this step.  The key is to be confident in what you define, write it down, and keep it somewhere where you can review it often. So many people fail in this step and find themselves blown around by other forces instead of creating their own life force by defining what is important, what you want, and creating a vision of what that looks like.

Read more…

Embracing Procrastination AND Developing Discipline

[tweetmeme]

In my quest to better understand how people are uniquely wired so as to better leverage gifts / talents / strengths / type, I learned that chronic procrastination can actually be attributed to certain personality types.  (Ahem … yes, including my own)

 Wow!  It is actually part of how I am wired and that can’t make it wrong, right?  I embrace my procrastination, fully!!!

Yes, there can be benefits to understanding one’s procrastination.  For me, I am EXTREMELY efficient AND effective and even quite creative under the “healthy” tension created towards the end of that procrastination cycle.  I have also come to understand that some behaviors I previously thought were attributed to procrastination in the way I work actually are not.  For example, I cannot just sit down and begin to write or create, I have to learn, think, and talk about it A WHOLE LOT before I’ve formed the idea well enough to begin writing.  Because of the way I mentally process in this way, when I do sit down to write, the ideas are more fully formed and that is part of the reason why I can knock it out so very quickly.

This is just one personal example related to my own unique wiring.  It makes me wonder about others’ and how their unique wiring mixes with procrastination behaviors in different ways.

But what about discipline?  Does a correlation exists between the two?  Do all extreme procrastinators, also consistently lack the ability to develop discipline in all aspects of life?  It can affect home, relationships, health, sleep, spirit, and just about anything else you can think of.

Nothing [is] so fatiguing as the eternal hanging on of an uncompleted task.”
–William James

After searching for resources on the development of discipline, I failed to find anything connecting the two together.

So, the question becomes:

How do procrastinators embrace the creative attributes that lead to procrastination while also developing discipline capabilities to better work towards and achieve goals?

Maybe there’s another way to look at it, another word besides “discipline”.  This reminds me of the process I use when leading teams through the Go Put Your Strengths To Work process by Marcus Buckingham.  After identifying your weaknesses, look at them through the lens of your strengths.  How might you re-frame weaknesses or use your strengths to accomplish the desired outcome as a way to skirt those weaknesses?

In the same way, how might you analyze your procrastination through the lens of your unique strengths?  How might you even leverage your strengths / preferences / type to overcome some of the negative affects of procrastination while still harnessing some of the creative benefits?

The Perfect Storm for Happiness at Work

[tweetmeme]

Are you happy at work?  Do your clients speak of their own happiness?  Do your clients increasingly express interest in finding meaning and happiness in their work?

We may just be in the fortunate position to witness and thrive in a Happiness at Work Perfect Storm; a set of conditions that makes workplace happiness possible in partnership with organizational productivity and outcomes.

At the Fall 2010 Colorado Career Development Association conference, Mark Guterman shared about the Changing Paradigm of Work.  He spoke of how work in the late 20th to 21st century is all about mind and heart coordination compared to emphasis on eye & mind coordination or hand and eye coordination from earlier in the 20th century.  Several conditions contributing to this new paradigm can be observed.

A more foundational condition relates to how the chasm between traditional science and spiritually opposing perspectives is shrinking.


Recent scientific explanations about how the brain works speaks to many of the same concepts as spirituality and holistic human views have long demonstrated.  For example, the 2004 award-winning documentary, What the BLEEP Do We Know draws from quantum physics to demonstrate the power of the brain to understand and even influence reality (scientific perspective).  In comparison, the best-selling book, The Secret, by Rhonda Byrne describes the law of attraction, the power of the mind to attract wealth, health, and happiness (spirituality perspective).

Read more…